To understand complexity,

we first need to understand simplicity

All life needs energy, to metabolise, grow, maintain internal balance (homeostasis), and maintain a functional immune system, for protection and survival. So where did this energy come from?

Essential energy came from electromagnetic radiation: emitted by the sun, received as ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This radiation comes as photons, in the form of particles (packets or Quanta) and wavelength (wave/particle duality). But, for life to use this energy, as it comes in the wrong format, it needs a function to convert the electromagnetic energy into electrochemical energy. Before we explore the conversion, we have to think about the very beginning of life.


The very first form of life on Earth would have been stimulated by gases, heat, light, water, acidity and alkalinity. This very first form of life must have had a mechanism to cope with varying levels of gases, hot/cold, light/dark (UV/IR radiation), wet/dry, varying levels of pH and high/low levels of salinity. We have theoretically discovered what this mechanism is, in terms of its chemical structure and functionality, when stimulated by the above stimuli, particularly UV/IR radiation.
With an understanding of fundamental biological science, some critical knowledge gained from our initial research into weather impacts on consumers, and using chemical drawing software, we  discovered a small biochemical compound. It passed all the tests as a valid structure. This small multifunctional biochemical structure, when stimulated by infrared (IR) radiation, has a naturally strong bond. However, when stimulated by UV radiation (which is known to break chemical bonds) has a weak bonding mode.

With an understanding of fundamental biological science, some critical knowledge gained from our initial research into weather impacts on consumers, and using chemical drawing software, we  discovered a small biochemical compound. It passed all the tests as a valid structure. This small multifunctional biochemical structure, when stimulated by infrared (IR) radiation, has a naturally strong bond. However, when stimulated by UV radiation (which is known to break chemical bonds) has a weak bonding mode.

It is within the structure of the small compound where electromagnetic energy is converted into electrochemical energy. When stimulated by IR, the small compound synthesises and releases a specific hormone. Inversely when stimulated by UV, the small compound synthesises and releases a different hormone. This, we suggest, is the vital survival and protection mechanism. And, as the two hormones are encoded as genes, this is where Quantum Genes© derive their name.
Every form of life, which has ever existed, had and still has this small compound/survival & protection mechanism, within mitochondrial cells. Without it, NO life could survive.

We have heard about mitochondrial Eve; well, the small compound/protection & survival mechanism could be considered as mitochondrial Adam, Eve, Cain, Abel, Seth & offspring.

Within the structure of the small compound there are enzymes used to catalyse chemical reactions. These chemical reactions synthesise hormones and a molecule which acts as, an acid and temperature regulator.
When stimulated by UV radiation and CO2 the small compound can conduct photosynthesis. Photosynthesis produces carbohydrates (sugars), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). This is how we use electromagnetic energy from the sun and convert it into usable electrochemical energy.
Other  molecules and ATP are used for self-replication on side-chains either side of the main structure centred around a very interesting heterocyclic compound. These reactions we believe fold one replicated side-chain under to join the replicated part on the other side of the main structure, via a helix process. This can occur, multiple times a day, twice a day or never in a day, depending on the wavelength/quantity of photons.

The strong bond with the heterocyclic ring is broken by UV radiation and the folding process to form the new structure occurs during UV stimuli and re-joins the newly synthesised other side during IR stimuli. Thus, creating a potential simple nucleic acid based around the heterocyclic ring.

Based on the above knowledge of a fundamental small compound/protection & survival mechanism, we have developed an array of genes (1,180) which have significant association with metabolism, growth, homeostasis and immune systems. These genes have the potential to cure diseases. Having said that, diseases mutate from time to time and change their genome. But there is a method to act quickly in cases of mutations occurring.

We have been collecting GeneCard™ arrays for the components of the small compound/protection & survival mechanism every 6 months for the last 10 years. This is because these sets are based on the latest research into the topics and research changes and advances. For metabolism and growth there are only 12 q-genes© (out of 1,180) not accounted for. It is possible research hasn’t identified the 12 q-genes© or research hasn’t yet found association with them.

As far as homeostasis and immune systems are concerned, there are 30 q-genes© which have not yet been associated with these functions.

One of the problems in identifying q-genes© is, they switch on or off depending on the UV/IR stimuli plus the half-life of some of the compounds. Two of which have very short half-lives during IR stimuli. As much research is conducted in UV conditions it is not surprising, they can be missed.

More than a coincidence?

Why are there no cures for most diseases, is there something missing from current knowledge and/or methods of research and development for new drugs and treatments?
In the first place we need to understand every living organism, including individual diseases, bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, plasmids, phages, etc  have their own immune genes. Without an immune system every organism would die. In simple terms every form of life has good genes (those conducting normal key life functions) and bad genes (mutations which disrupt the normal key life functions). q-genes© are, we suggest, the good ones.

Arrays of genes for each disease in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Top10 list of most deadly diseases, were downloaded from GeneCards®

[GeneCards® extracts and integrates gene-related data, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical, and functional information. This is automatically mined from >100 carefully selected web sources, thereby allowing one-stop access to a very broad information base. GeneCards® overcomes barriers of data format and heterogeneity and uses standard nomenclature and approved gene symbols. It presents a rich subset of data for each gene and provides deep links to the original sources for further scrutiny. GeneCards® is widely used and assists in the understanding of gene-related aspects of biology and medicine]. A very big thank you to the Weizmann Institute of Science for providing this wonderful application.

We then downloaded arrays of genes associated with each of many drugs used to treat each disease, (over 100). Analysis of the top 10 diseases (HD/Stroke combined) showed the following results.

More than a coincedence:

What we found is, the diseases had smaller percentages of associated q-genes© and larger percentages of associated non-q-genes. We suggest the q-genes© associated with the diseases are the diseases natural immune system. The drugs used to treat the diseases had significantly higher percentages of associated q-genes© than non-q-genes. Apart from Diarrheal diseases and HIV/AIDS all the other WHO Top10 diseases showed the same outcome.

Call it coincidence, but perhaps this shows drug developers are trying to emulate q-genes©, without knowing what they are?

At this stage, we had noticed the newer drugs used, had larger percentages of q-genes©, so we downloaded the top 100 selling drugs (Jun 2018) and analysed each one with GeneCards™ and found the following:

Potential Solutions:

If we know the genome of a disease, which includes the good genes and the bad genes, we can identify the good genes (q-genes©). If we were able to boost these good genes it would help the organism fight its own bad genes and reduce the effectiveness of them. Which is what we think drug developers are trying to do without knowing what q-genes© are.

There are possibilities for personalised treatment. With the cost of genome readers becoming ever lower it is possible and relatively inexpensive to obtain an individual genome read-out. From there we can identify the good genes and bad genes.


Another possibility would be to switch on/off genes by radiation treatment. As q-genes© become active in the IR part of the spectrum, IR radiation therapy may help. However, there is a drawback by using IR radiation treatment in humans during hours of UV radiation, as this treatment can cause depression. We also have to consider the half-life of the two major signalling hormones as the timing of treatment is important to avoid any further problems.

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